In the months leading up to your divorce, many questions may run through your mind – including fears about the future. If your spouse has always been the breadwinner in your relationship, you may worry about maintaining your standard of living after the split.

The Colorado family courts may grant one spouse in a divorce case spousal support. Spousal support, or partner support in domestic partnerships, helps the lower-earning spouse financially after a divorce. There is no cap on how much you could receive in spousal support in Colorado.

How much could you receive?

The courts typically reserve spousal support awards for divorce cases in which one spouse earns significantly less than the other. If your spouse had the career and you stayed home to look after the kids, for example, you could be eligible for alimony. A judge will look at many different factors when calculating the support amount, including the following:

  • Both spouses’ incomes
  • Your education level and work experience
  • The duration of the marriage or partnership
  • Child custody considerations
  • Both spouses’ ages and health statuses

To receive any amount of spousal support, you or your attorney will need to prove your eligibility. You will have to establish to a judge that you need short- or long-term financial support from your ex-spouse to maintain your standard of living. This may take proof such as financial statements and establishing your lack of earning capacity.

Each case is unique

Spousal support payments are not one-size-fits-all. The amount you could receive will be unique to your specific situation. A lawyer can give you an estimate of what you may be able to obtain in a spousal support order. In general, if you have a high-asset divorce case and do not have any income or work experience, you will most likely qualify for alimony. Colorado does not place a limit on how much a person can receive. A lawyer could help you maximize your award amount.