No one is immune to family abuse, including those who are admired in the world of professional sports. There have been many incidents that have involved allegations of domestic violence, though not every accusation ends in charges. Colorado residents who face this serious social issue do have recourse to keep themselves and their loved ones safe.

Recently, a notable pitcher for the Boston Red Sox was arrested on allegations that he committed a misdemeanor offense against his spouse at his residence. According to the accounts, Steven Wright engaged in a heated exchange and purportedly prevented his wife from calling emergency dispatchers at first concerning his actions. She did finally call, however, and officials arrived and placed Wright under arrest.

Under the laws for his home state, Wright was detained for the minimum 12 hours before being eligible for release. The following day, he posted the required bond and was released. Both local authorities and the Major League Baseball commission are currently investigating the incident, and it is unknown if the criminal charges against him will eventually be dropped based on the fact that the confrontation was described as non-physical.

Whether he faces criminal consequences, it is expected that Wright will likely be subjected to some suspension time based on these allegations. An official statement issued through the family’s spokesperson claimed that the couple are working together to resolve any difficulties they may be experiencing, and they requested respect for their privacy. There have been several major league individuals who have faced varying suspensions, though only one was ultimately officially charged with domestic violence. Colorado victims who are struggling with this serious matter do have the right to contact an experienced and compassionate family law professional who can advise them as to their options to ensure the safety of their family.

Source: USA Today, “Steven Wright: Red Sox pitcher arrested on alleged domestic assault“, Gabe Lacques and A.J. Perez, Dec. 11, 2017